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Big Blue Saw Blog General Updates

Big Blue Saw Customer Appreciation Sale Sept. 19-21

Big Blue Saw's biggest sale ever runs from Monday, September 19 through Wednesday, September 21 thanks to 3 of our most supportive communities of customers. Big Blue Saw is offering discounts on the following THREE materials:

  • 0.1875 inch (4.8 mm) thick aluminum 6061
  • 0.06 inch (1.5 mm) thick stainless steel 304
  • 0.125 inch (3.2 mm) thick aluminum 5052

Each of these materials represent something special to 3 online communities who have helped Big Blue Saw grow over the years.
 

0.1875" Aluminum 6061



This is the material of choice for the waterjet cut parts of the FarmBot Genesis. Interest in this robotic gardening machine is growing, and Big Blue Saw can help you build yours by cutting the brackets from aluminum.

Of course, this material is useful for a variety of other things as well: electric cycles, lightweight tools, aircraft parts and bottle openers to name a few.
 

0.06" Stainless Steel 304


This decorative and tough material makes an excellent keyboard plate for enthusiasts assembling their own custom mechanical switch keyboards. This group needs their keyboards made THEIR way and Big Blue Saw's online quoting and ordering system lets them easily order one off parts.

Stainless steel is renowned for its luxurious appearance and corrosion resistance, making it a great material for decorative pieces like jewelry, charms, and outdoor signs. And recently I read in the RioBotz Combat Robot Tutorial that stainless steel 304 has outstanding mechanical toughness as well.


0.125" Thick Aluminum 5052

 


The Astromech community is dedicated rebuilding and re-imagining the droids of the Star Wars universe. We first started to see some sales from this group back in 2013, but it wasn't until 2014 when CAD designs for various droid parts became publicly available that sales really took off. Word spread that if you wanted foot shells waterjet cut, Big Blue Saw was the place to go. We waterjet or laser cut a number of different designs over the years for individual hobbyists who want to bring their robotic creations to life.

The uses for aluminum 5052 extend way beyond robots, though. Its high strength, weldability and formability make it a great choice for lighting fixtures, control panels, and costumes, plus many of the other things on our list of waterjet cutting applications.


The Sale

During the sale, all orders placed online for the sale materials will automatically receive a quantity discount.

Let's take a look at what this means for some of our loyal customers.

A set of farmbot brackets, waterjet cut from 0.1875" thick aluminum 6061 is normally priced at $178.00 in quantity 1, but during the sale will be just $142.70, or 20% off.

The Astromech battery box, waterjet cut from 0.125" thick aluminum 5052,  normally costs  $112.80 in quantity 1. During the sale, this will cost only $77.50, a savings of 31%.

The sample 60% size openable Alps-compatible keyboard plate, waterjet cut from 0.06" stainless steel is usually $92.10 for quantity 1, but during the sale is just $42.00. That's 54% off the regular price!

Order real parts made from your designs by uploading them now to the online quoting system. Remember, the sale runs from Monday, September 19, through Wednesday September 21.

Soap

You've seen our parts in action grabbing asteroids, fighting robots, and growing lettuce. But Big Blue Saw helps keep the world clean as well.

We were contacted by Saiful Islam about a part needed for a soap plodder, which is a type of extrusion machine for making soap. Our services were needed to keep a production line working.

In the photo below,  you can see the part Big Blue Saw waterjet cut to keep the production line running. It's a round plate, about 4 inches in diameter, where the soap emerges from the plodder. The hole in the center is shaped to match the profile of the soap.

 

The shape varies depending on the product being made. Here's another shape we made.

Here's an overview showing a little more of the process.

The finished product, after cutting and molding.

We Help Move Asteroids

Here's a project that brought Big Blue Saw closer to the final frontier.

Sherman Lam from the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) wrote to tell us about how some of the parts from a recent order from Big Blue Saw are being used:

We’re developing a robotic gripper for the Asteroid Redirect Mission. This component (we call it a microspine) will have hooks embedded in it that adhere to rough surfaces. The [image] shows one subassembly of the gripper. This image only shows one microspine unit in the assembly but in flight, there will be 20ish microspines in the assembly.  The spacecraft will have 1000s of these hooks on each gripper and it’ll use these grippers to grab onto a boulder. 

Big Blue Saw helped by waterjet cutting some of the microspine 6061 alloy in 0.063 inch thickness. Here's a peek at JPL's raw design as it was uploaded to our online quoting system.

For more information about the Asteroid Redirect Mission, check out the video below.

Even if you're not bringing rocks from the heavens back to earth, Big Blue Saw can still help with your projects. Check out our gallery of example parts and upload your design to our online quoting and ordering system today.

Prepare Yourself: Sale Coming On Custom Aerospace Aluminum Parts

CC BY-SA 4.0 Elekes Andor Ville de Montbard, France

Aluminum sculpture in Ville de Montbard, France. Photo CC BY-SA 4.0 Elekes Andor.

Regular customers know that we like to announce our sales early. This way, if you have an idea for a metal part, you have a chance to get the design ready before the sale begins. Today we're giving the details on the sale coming up later this month.

From Monday, August 15, through Wednesday, August 17, Big Blue Saw will be having a sale on waterjet cut 6061 alloy aluminum in 1/8 inch (0.125") thickness. Any order placed online during the sale will automatically receive a quantity discount.

6061 alloy is made by combining blending pure aluminum with silicon, copper, magnesium, and chromium in just the right amounts. This alloy has a very useful combination of strength, toughness, corrosion resistance, and weldability.  You will find aluminum 6061 used both for decorative purposes, like signs, as well as structural ones like on the BattleBot Bite Force, or the Space Shuttle. The Pioneer Plaque, humankind's message to extraterrestrials, made to last through milennia of space travel, was made of aluminum 6061.

Remember: the sale starts Monday, August 15. Get ready early by verifying your design in our online quoting system.

Carl Olsen on What It Costs to Make Waterjet Parts

Image © Steve Brown Photography CC-BY-SA-3.0

Note: Carl Olsen of waterjets.org was created this informative piece that we thought we'd pass along.

There are a variety of ways to calculate the cost of making parts with a waterjet. This is true of most businesses, and the calculation of "Cost of Goods" is the subject of many books and business classes. This page looks at some approaches to calculating the cost of goods for parts made with a waterjet, which will then help you determine how much to charge for a part.

A lot of people price the work on their machines on dollars per hour basis. This may make sense for some kinds of machines, but not for a waterjet. A job shop with a multi-head machine running two pumps or a high power pump might have a much higher cost of operation than a shop with a small machine with a low power pump. If these two shops compete against each other purely on dollars per hour, then the shop with the smaller cheaper machine will make a lot more money. This is because the parts will take longer to make, and they will be cheaper to make, so the customer pays more yet the part costs less to make. The shop with the faster machine must therefore charge more per hour to take advantage of their faster machine.

Another strategy is to price the work based on a dollars per square inch basis. This has the drawback that a part with a lot of geometry to it (curves and corners and pierces) will take a much longer time than a straight line cut, because the waterjet must slow down to avoid blow-out at the corners and turns. Likewise, material thickness and many other factors come into play, and cutting speed is not a linear function relating to thickness. So, while $/square inch may make sense for some machines, it does not for waterjets.

The best approach is to figure out how much it will cost you to make the part. Then estimate how much it would cost to make the part by competitive methods (either other kinds of machines, or your competitor with an waterjet). See if there are other savings such as being able to squeeze more parts from expensive material. Then, price from there. Your customer does not need to know if you are charging them $100per hour. They are not paying you for your time, they are paying your for the part.

Another option that can work, if you prefer a simpler, more objective formula, is to simply cost your work based on your true cost to make the part. Many machines have software built in to make this easy. Simply take the cost to make the part, and multiply by a factor, and there you have it.

The cost to make your part should include the following factors:

  • How much time will it take to program the path into a tool path? (And if the customer provides the toolpath in a compatible file format, any price break you might choose to give them.)
  • How much risk is there that you might break something (such as when cutting glass) and need to scrap it and start over?
  • Does the customer provide the material, or do you need to purchase the material?
  • How many times must you pierce the material? Each pierce is extra wear and tear on machine, and the associated risk of a nozzle plug or material cracking during piercing.
  • How much do your consumables cost you?
    • Electricity
    • Water
    • Abrasive
    • Spares and wear parts
  • Is there any special setup or risk to consider?
  • How much time will it take to actually do the cutting?
  • How much time will it take you to load and unload the parts and material, and clean up the machine afterwards?
  • Is the customer ordering a large quantity?
  • Is this taking your machine away from doing another possibly more profitable job?

Typical price ranges

Prices range up to $2000.00 per hour for some parts, but $100 to $135 per hour is more typical, and it can be as low as $80/hour. You should look at the part to machine, and think of what it would cost on a mill, or other competing equipment. Then price the part slightly under that, and make a good profit. However, pricing and pricing strategies are highly dependant on local market conditions.

Bidding

If you are looking to have a part made, you should contact several job shops in your area. Each job shop has their own strengths and weaknesses. Some are better at long production runs of the same part over and over, while others are better at short runs, cheap prototyping, or high precision.

They may charge you quite a bit more money per hour for waterjet machine time, than they would for time on other machines. However, you will probably also get more parts per hour for an overall savings. If you don't like the dollars per hour that they charge, then consider getting your own machine so that you can start your own business.

Note that often you get what you pay for. The lowest bid is not necessarily the best part, on time, and with good service.

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Big Blue Saw
5.0 stars - based on 17 reviews
Waterjet and Laser Cut Custom Parts.
Address for correspondence only:
3522 Ashford Dunwoody Rd NE #145
Atlanta, GA 30319
Phone: (678) WAY-SAW4 (678) 929-7294