Customer Success Stories

From the workshop of Andrew Lindsey comes this remarkable walking robot.

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My favorite features are

  • The glowing indicator light made from a uranium-glass marble flanked by six high-power UV LEDs.
  • The fact that it can flip itself over and run upside-down just as easily as right side up.

Most of the external metalwork was done by Mr. Lindsey, but he used Big Blue Saw to make the internal frame. He writes

The primary chassis of the robot is made from a single piece of waterjet-cut steel plate from Big Blue Saw. I was originally reluctant to order parts made for the robot as I wanted as much of it as possible to be hand-made, but having parts custom-cut turned out to be a very good idea. I was able to get some very complex and organic pieces of metal made with great precision, which eliminated issues with servo alignment in previous versions.

Read more about it at his blog or see photos in the Flickr photoset.

One of our customers is working on a very interesting project: a human electric trike. Some of the waterjet cut parts from Big Blue Saw are visible in this blog post.

Carlo Bertocchini sent in this charming photo of two of his latest robotic creations with his two boys. Many of the metal robot parts were created with the help of Big Blue Saw.

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Our customer pemdas wrote to send us a photo of the keyboard he created with some help from Big Blue Saw.

The top plate was waterjet cut by Big Blue Saw from 0.063" thick aluminum 6061.

Here's what he had to say about our work:

Everything was perfect. Will definitely be using your services again for my future projects!


You guys made this so much easier than I thought it was going to be when I first started planning this project.


I keep thinking I should've ordered more than one just for the savings.

Pemdas also gave some details on the build:

I used vintage cherry blacks for the switches because I had a bunch of them laying around. They are linear switches and very smooth.



The outline was the easiest part! I used a tool made by a forum member named swill. I believe you guys worked with him as well for the water jet services.



My controller was the standard teensy 2.0 using the tmk firmware made by the another user named Hasu. That base plus a guide made by user matt3o made making the firmware super easy! No pcb meant handwiring which wasn't as bad as I thought it would be.



As for the keycaps in the picture they are a key set called Retro DSAs. They were from a group buy held many years ago. Sadly the only way to get them now is to purchase or trade for them second hand.

 
Thanks! And if you're interested in making your own custom keyboard, check out the Swillkb Plate & Case Builder and our custom keyboard example parts.