More projects made with Big Blue Saw...

Customer Projects

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From the reckless abandon blog comes Brian Stephens' story of an how he used Big Blue Saw to help improve his video arcade cabinet.

The mounting plates on his new Ultimarc Mag-Stik joysticks didn't match the holes on his cabinet. So back in August Brian took advantage of Free Part Day to create a new set of custom mounting plates. The plates are made from 0.125 inch 6061 aluminum. Check out reckless abandon for more details.

Shane Colton of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology e-mailed us to tell the tale of the fantastic electric go-kart that he and a group of students built with help from Big Blue Saw. It's electrically powered and features a massive steel flywheel for regenerative braking custom made by Big Blue Saw.

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I spent a while wondering how to machine a piece of steel that big and have it balanced. Waterjet makes the most sense because it cuts the center and the OD from the same reference. Anyway, we've got some really nice, clean data now from the regenerative braking circuit. (Imagine spinning those disks up to 3,000rpm and then pushing all that energy into a capacitor.) [...]

I and the group of high school students I work with appreciate the Big Blue Saw service. We've used it now for two summer projects (last year was a DIY segway scooter, which I think has been replicated a few times actually). We have six OMAX machines on campus, and I've used three of them, but it's still easier and cheaper (and often faster) from your site for many things, especially when you factor in material cost. More importantly, in terms of showing students that you can make pretty much anything without necessarily having to be an MIT engineer, it's a great tool.

Thanks for the kind words, Shane.

Shane further notes:

Flywheels this size are pretty dangerous. I wasn't that worried at 3,000rpm. But I wouldn't want somebody to go making a 10,000rpm version and have it fail. A containment is probably a good idea.

In other words, don't try this unless you know what you're doing.

This gorgeous image was sent in by one of our customers, who used parts from Big Blue Saw to make a Nixie clock.

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From David Wegmuller comes this whimiscal creation: a hamster wheel powered by a steam engine.

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One of our customers is working on a very interesting project: a human electric trike. Some of the waterjet cut parts from Big Blue Saw are visible in this blog post.

Carlo Bertocchini sent in this charming photo of two of his latest robotic creations with his two boys. Many of the metal robot parts were created with the help of Big Blue Saw.

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Casey Kuhns of the University of Northern Colorado Space Grant Team sent in these pictures of their robotic rover, built for the Colorado Space Grant Consortium's DemoSat research program.

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